Slow Cooked Goat and Fennel Stew. I love goat and have done ever since I tried it in Greece. It is getting easier to get hold of in the UK but it can be quite difficult. I am not sure why as it is so delicious and is a different source of meat other than beef, chicken or pork. I once asked my local butcher and they said that they couldn’t get it because not enough people would eat it so it would be a waste for them. Which is a shame.

Goat and Fennel Stew

Goat and fennel stew

This recipe is adapted from Rick Stein’s wonderful book Venice to Istanbul, if you haven’t got that book, you should ask for it for your birthday or even just buy it yourself off of Amazon. Seriously it’s a wonderful book which takes you on a tour of Venice to Istanbul, it includes some recipes from Rick Stein as well as some he picked up on his travels. It is one of my favourite recipe books of the many I have.

Goat and Fennel Stew

Goat and Fennel Stew

So back to goat, it is a very lean meat which benefits from either flash cooking over a high heat or slow cooking until it is meltingly tender and falls off the bone. You can generally buy it from your Farmer’s market, if you have one. I do know Waitrose and Ocado sell it, however they can be quite expensive. I was fortunate enough to get some goat from our local Halal butcher. When I went into my local Indian Supermarket to get some spices and ground almonds (seriously they are so much cheaper in your local Indian Supermarket, £10 for a large bag), I happened to see a sign which said goat, 1kg for £4.99. I asked the guy behind the counter and he said that yes that was indeed the price.

Goat and Fennel Stew

Goat and Fennel Stew

So needless to say, I instantly bought 2kg of it on the bone. I had a friend visiting from South Africa who has also been to Greece with me and who also loves goat, so we decided to make this dish for her before she flew back. She was delighted.

Goat and Fennel Stew

Goat and Fennel Stew

This dish is really simply to make, as you mix everything in a large bowl (in this case, two large bowls) pop it into a roasting dish and four hours later your house smells like a greek kitchen and the goat is tender and you and your guests are salivating. The flavours of the fennel and the goat infuse the potatoes which pick up the all the flavour released into the oils and almost braise in the liquid.  As this made such a large amount, we froze it in two large freezer bags and had two additional meals.

So I would strongly recommend that you seek out some goat and make this dish today.

As this meal is slow cooked, I will be entering it into the Slow Cooked February Challenge, which is hosted by the fabulous Janice of Farmers Girl Kitchen and Lucy from Baking Queen 74, you can find out more about the Slow Cooked Challenge here.

Enjoy.

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Goat and Fennel Stew

  • Prep Time: 30 mins
  • Cook Time: 4 hours
  • Total Time: 4 hours 30 minutes
  • Yield: 6 - 8 Hungry people

Ingredients

  • 2 kg goat meat on the bone cut into chunks (ask the butcher)
  • 1.5 kg new potatoes halved
  • 8 cloves Garlic sliced
  • 3 white onions thickly sliced
  • 200 g spring onions chopped
  • 15 artichoke hearts i used two tins, feel free to freshly trim them
  • 100 ml fresh lemon juice or use the bottled one
  • 1 1/2 tbsp tomato paste
  • 3 tbsp passata
  • 2 tsp sea salt
  • 14 turns black pepper
  • 1 1/2 tbsp mustard powder
  • 2 tsp sugar demerara is fine
  • 200 ml water
  • 2 large fennels, sliced reserve the top of the fennel to add as flavour
  • 150 ml Olive oil
  • 1/2 bottle dry white wine
  • 1 tbsp dried oregano

Instructions

  1. Place the goat meat in two large bowls dividing it evenly between the two bowls. Then add the potatoes, garlic, spring onions, fennel, onions and artichokes, splitting equally between two bowls. If you can fit it into one bowl, then use one bowl. My bowl was a bit too small so I had to split it. Better yet, if you have a large roasting tin, mix everything together in there.
  2. In a separate smaller bowl, mix together the lemon juice, tomato paste, pasta, salt and pepper, mustard powder, sugar and and water and pour over the meat. Leave it to marinate for two hours.
  3. Just before the end of marinading time, preheat the oven to 150 degrees without fan.
  4. Once you have finished marinading, if you didn’t marinade in the actual roasting tin, tip everything out into a large roasting tray (or split between two), drizzle the olive oil over the meat and then pour the wine over the meat. Mix to combine using a large spoon.
  5. Cook covered for three hours with foil, then cook uncovered for one hour without foil. Allow to cool for 5 minutes then serve.

Notes

You don’t need to serve any sides with this, but you could serve a nice greek salad or  tzatziki on the side and maybe a little bread to soak up the juices.

As mentioned above, use a large bowl for marinading and really mix everything together so everything gets coated in the marinade. If your bowl is two small, split it up into two bowls. Likewise if you don’t have a large roasting tin (I didn’t) split it between two tins and cook for the same length of time, you may need to switch the roasting tins around to ensure the goat gets covered nicely.